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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 12,179 (some duplicates have been removed)
party, and i'm fortunate to call many of them my friends, assure us they share the conviction that winning the war against terrorism is our government's most important obligation. i don'tt doubt their sincerity they emphasize that military action alone won't protect us, that this war has many fronts, in courts, financial institutions, in the shadowy world of intelligence, and in diplomacy. they stress that america needs the help of our friends, to combat the evil that threatens us all. that our alliances are as important to victory as is our armies. we agree. and as we've been a good friend to other countries in moments of shared perils, so we have good reason to expect their solidarity with us in this struggle. >> [applause] >> that is what the president believes, that is what the president believes, and thanks to his efforts, we have received valuable assistance from many good friends around the globe, even if we have at times been disappointed with the reactions of some. i don't doubt the sincerity of my democratic friends and they should not doubt ours. >> [applause] our
she knows you and wants you to join her. and how they use the network is the use of the connect feature to send messages. her daughter can send messages to everybody in the network letting them know how she is doing. they used to the calendar to schedule appointments and organize rides. they use the shared tasks and goals to organize larger events. for example, when joe was released from the hospital, she was unable to get back into her home because she could not get up the stairs anymore. they used the network to build her a ramp on saturday afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open soc
for people? there is something that makes us hesitant to reach out to others. some of us can take this idea of independence to an extreme. i think this is probably some place in newfoundland, a remote shore of canada. we have come to believe that reaching out to others is a sign of weakness. was he asking for help and support as a vulnerability instead of a necessary strength. so if you agree with me that connections are the key to a good life, i would like you to explore with me how technology, and in particular, how that works can actually help. i would like to tell you about ties in the online network service. that is installed on every b-top computer in san francisco. this knowledge built on 20 years of connections to secure the future. it creates personal, private, secure online networks. here is what happened personal network looks like. and joe and her daughter created a network together, and what they did, they created a network in part because guildhall has an advance in her experience with cancer, and they wanted to coordinate the care and the connections and bring people closer t
recorded trade volume of $231 billion u.s., an increase of 12%. china is of the first largest and growing market. china is the no. 1 market for agriculture for u.s. agricultural products like soybeans and cotton. soybeans are 60% of -- is sold to china. one-third of u.s. cotton is sold to china. china is also an important market for u.s. automobiles and aircraft. china also is in long-term market for u.s. service industry. in this area, the u.s. has done a long time service. at the same time, the chinese want to prepare -- entrepreneurs are interested in making investments in the united states so there are more and more chinese companies coming to the united states and investments. according to chinese statistics, for the last 18 months, the chinese investment in the united states grew by 18-40% -- by 14%. it is up to $6 billion. the investment is still a small figure. it is growing very fast. today, our common interests have expanded and interdependence has been deepened. now, as the impact of the financial crisis still lingers, both china and the united states have committed to transfor
to keep us and other bookstores healthy in the long run. >> for information on this and other cities visited a c-span's local content vehicles, visit c-span.org/local content. >> coming up next on booktv, after words with guest hosts former national security council official landsden sun center president ellen laipson. this week marine corps reserve colonel david crist in this book "the twilight war." in at the military advisor of the middle east discusses what he calls the secret history of american's 30 year conflict with iran and the failure of both sides to commit to a diplomatic solution. >> host: david congratulations on this nip it. it's really a sweeping story of one of the most dramatic captures in contemporary u.s. foreign policy, one of the hardest challenges i think for our decision-makers in the relationship with iran and the non-relationship with iran as we might say. i thought we might begin that discussion with some, to just put, to explain to our listeners, why and how you wrote the book, some of the mythological issues so we get that straight before we get into some
vividly told stories of his 30 years of u.s. iranian in each man from the perspective of our military to military interaction. so i wonder if we could just start with -- tell us why you wrote the book and how you wrote it can bring you our a government historian and this book was really done any different methodology. guests of the dissertation started back in in foreign policy and persian gulf. one of the catalysts for me as far as an interest in the region at both was my father had been the u.s. central commander from 85 to 88 to the u.s. military command from the middle east. at least that spurred an interest even though as a young lieutenant at the time and ranchers prefer different the march geopolitical issues. but after desert storm come work at a school with an interest in the middle east have got me quite interested in doing best in the region. it started with a dissertation and back to. i intended to read a book about the time -- just 90 book contract two days before 9/11 happened, which was a far different the thinness and then after my military experience is in iraq and af
growth." two members of the council of advisers on science and technology are joining us this week on the communicators. on the left is craig mundie and on the right is mark gorenberg. mark gorenberg is a venture capitalist out of silicon valley. if you would, start by telling us, what is the presidential council of science and technology. >> it started back in the fdr days. this has 21 members. it is chaired by the president's science adviser. also eric lander who is a co- chair and a vice chaired by bill press. we work on a number of reports that were done the forest them education, manufacturing nanotechnology, health i.t., a number of other issues. the text of this study in the fall as you talk about looking at the full potential of federal spectrum. >> summarize this report that you all gave to the president. >> in the report, we make a series of recommendations that stand -- span a range of issues beginning with the question of, what should the strategy be long-term for the country in order to avail itself of the benefits that come from the new technologies and electronic and
and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we u
. in minnesota, they use september elections in odd years. it seems to me including those is comparing apples to apples. in terms of the state primary, all i was suggesting was using the most recent 2012 data because you are already using state primary. you already have said in the report. it stopped at 2010. including 2012, it would make sense. it is the most recent data. you already have a category for statewide primaries. you include the u.s. senate, the governor, and those races. >> we use the primary only as an example. there is nowhere else i use the primary information in our report for -- i never looked out over votes in primaries at all. it just looks at primary's in general about 65% of winner- take-all. i could not use september's election if i wanted to keep that formats until i had november's numbers. >> if you think about it with a plurality election, if you compare everyone who votes for the top two, their ballots counted in the final round. everyone else who did not voted for those top two, it is similar to where their ballots has exhausted. it is this ironic thing that everyo
difference. i have believed the world looks to us to say it is -- if it is possible to live together across every conceivable difference. we're proud of our home and place in history and proud of our example. but we also are humble in the context of the world we're living in. a world that is another connected but hyper-connected with a merger of i.t. and globalization. we recognize our faith -- fate is connected to the fate of others. that is the spirit that binds us together. the spirit that brings us here today. i want to close by reminding you that california is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laureate's than any other state or we still lay claim to five of the top universities based on the shanghai index in the world. caltech, stanford university, and three of our public universities, not least of which the university is a stone's throw away. uc-berkeley campus. we're proud of the state but we also recognize we have challenges and we need to
that one of the things that happens is people come in who have been using technology, and they have their own systems for use in it, and we let them. we do not try to change how people are using it. an example of that is my grandmother. she was a wonderful baker. i miss her, but i miss her baked goods more. she never had used a still in the old country that had thermostat. she would turn the stove on all the way to broil, and it would heat up like a furnace, and then she would turn it off, and then put her stuff in and cook it. if it got too cold, she would turn it on again. it drove my parents crazy, but she made wonderful food. she was never going to learn this technology, but she had adapted to it. we recognize that people do that. if people have something that works, you leave it alone. another issue that people have on computers is -- and it is a real frustration for a lot of seniors -- that things do not show up in the same place. we try to set up people's computers so that it is recognizable. if you are using a macintosh, and it has the dock that has all the controls on it, y
of the greats we know it's true for when you graced us -- our town of san francisco our golden sun will shine on new -- you ♪ [applause] mr. bennett. ♪ it only takes a tiny corner of this great big world to find a place that you love you have brought us so much joy you are a golden boy we love to have you here in our great towner of -- town of san francisco open your golden gates san francisco here is your wondering words singing other places only make me love you better you are the heart of all the gold in the world san francisco welcome me home again i'm coming home ♪ [applause] >> keep the applause going for the fabulous lisa malone. that was just terrific. [applause] i almost wore the same thing today. [laughter] would have been so awkward. [laughter] no, she was fantastic. now, everyone, without further ado, ladies and gentlemen, please welcome our host, the 43rd mayor of the city and county of san been cisco, the honorable edwin m. lee -- the 43rd mayor of the city and county of san francisco. [applause] mayor lee: wow, welcome to city hall. and thank you, beach blanket babylon. w
, that are wrongful behavior but not official misconduct. >> what is the principal you use to draw the line? -- what is the principle you use to draw the line? >> i do not think we need to set a bright line rule, necessarily, unless you are uncomfortable with the fact, and you need to set a bright line rule. i think we need to figure out where the facts here rise to that level. i do not know that we have to set a rule for any time this comes up. >> i agree with that. i just asked because i am trying to get comfortable with this idea that -- what i like about bright lines is that it is easy for the next person to follow. i think, in a vacuum, bright lines are better than not bright lines. >> it is hard to find a bright -- >> you are right. our task is not to create -- we probably could decide without establishing a bright line rule, but i am trying to get comfortable with not having a bright line rule, and how you would decide similar issues, if we went with a more vague -- >> it is hard to draw a line with only one docked. part of our problem is we have just this one matter. we do not know whettmvá
included? if you would like to participate in the discussion that we will air on booktv. e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. . . linda u.s. after 9/11 invaded afghanistan, and i don't know, some of you are too young to remember, but you might remember looking at our tv screens and seen the pictures of the very fancy new weapons that we had, and this idea that we now had these precision weapons that would only target the people that we wanted to get, and would not result in collateral damage. and it was almost a way to say to people, calm down, don't be worried. we won't a killing innocent people. so, i was worried, because i don't have a sense that the latest and greatest new weapon is going to protect innocent people and went to afghanistan two weeks after the invasion with several other colleagues. it was before we even got into afghanistan around the border of pakistan that we found already people who would be considered collateral damage. the first young woman i met is somebody who sticks with me because she looks like my daughter. she was 13 years old and my daughter at that time
send it to us, we had it on the air and a couple of minutes. because of technology, because of things changing so rapidly. it is a brand new world. vicki, thank you for the importance of that network and everything else. thank you. next, i want to introduce you to a gentleman. he is tall, dark, handsome. sorry, that was me. wrong script. [laughter] you, too, right? it's your birthday, right? ok. in all seriousness, a gentleman by the name of dmitri is here. i want you to meet him. his name is dmitri belzer. he has worked in the disability community for years providing technology access for more than 30 years. trained as a sign language expert and interpreter, he established a death services program ast san francisco state university, provided support services for colleges. we don't call them disabled. they happen to have a disability. he joined pacific bell, helped organize honda the advisory group for people that happen to have a disability. he gave them put to that company on how to develop features that will help them do better. he became the director of death and disable
used assisted technology is a two-inch-long piece of black ls will take, used to cover the flashing light on the vcr and the dvd player -- black electrical tape. she says it is easier the learning to program the clock. for the most part, a lot of seniors to not trust technology. people have gotten the word that there are risks to using technology, and a lot of seniors want to stay away from it. as much as i want to get my mother to do online banking and paying her bills, never going to happen. she is never going to do that. at the center for accessible technology, we work to understand the mindset of our clients, and as a result, we have systems in place of how we work with them. one of the things we do is we asked people -- what do you want to use a computer for? i cannot tell you how many people tell us they have never been asked that. they have been told they need to use a computer, but no one has told the what they need it for. sometimes we hear that people do not have anything they want to use it for, but a lot of times, they have something in particular. we tried to focus on s
of dogs. that will keep him busy. .. >> host: contemporary u.s. foreign policy, one with of the hardest challenges, i think, for our decision makers is the relationship with iran or the nonrelationship with iran as we might say. i thought we might begin our discussion to just put, explain to our listeners, um, why and how you wrote the book, some of the method logical issues so that we get that straight before we get into some of the vividly-told story t of this 30 years of u.s./iranian engagement from the perspective of our sort of military-to-military interactions. so i wonder if we could just start with tell us why you wrote and book and how you wrote it considering that you are a government historian, but this book was really done in a, through a different methodology. >> guest: right. it was done, the genesis of it started as a dissertation many years ago back in the '90s on reagan foreign policy and the persian gulf. one of the catalysts for me as far as an interest in the region itself was my father had been the u.s. central command commander from '85-'88 which was the u.s. milit
was with us in 2009. goopublic works is here. this reminds us of the 3000 people but passed away in 1906 from the devastating earthquake, but the rebirth of our city is with us. i have been in all of these other positions where we are always prepared. and we are already engaged in recovery efforts. we were there with a whole staff. we have six we assure you that when the next big event happens, that water system will be there for us to deliver water with that 24 hours. a huge change from depending on this fountain. we are handing it off to generations of youth in the city to understand -- make sure they're prepared. go to our website, it tells you all the things there. iti is about having those items prepared.w we will survive. that is how we get ready and celebrate and honor the people who left us and make sure our city is ready. thank you for being here. congratulations to our survivors. >> very nice job. behind me is a good friend and a great firechief. you go back 106 years. braxton morning. -- good morning. one of the survivors could not be with us. those are amazing changes. it does giv
you enjoy the great opening act? thank you so much for joining us tonight for san francisco's asian pacific heritage celebration. yes. and that is giving u.s. side of things to come, but i want to tell you what about the opening performance that you saw. it was proudly presented by the american center for the philippine arts, and it means a "from the village of." it is alive journey of the man struggling with the responsibility. the untapped and dynamism of the folk dance. it was created by the choreographer and performed by san francisco dance artists jonathan mercado, henry lau, maritoni madrano and kimberly requesto. give them an opening applause for that act. [applause] as for this group here, we request that you stand for the singing of the national anthem. >> ♪ oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hail at the twilight's last gleaming ♪ ♪ who's broad stripes and bright stars through theh perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? ♪ ♪ and the rockets' red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the ni
>> the other question i wanted to pass, if you can give us a sense of where we are compliance was. part of the audit that we did two years ago found that we were out of compliance in a lot of areas. what i am hoping is that we have addressed those compliance areas. and according to this day, this is our certification that we say we are going to comply can deliver services. but how are we doing? >> the annual service plan and the actual budget plan and not related to compliance. we received funding and we need to document how we are using this funding. what services are we providing to account for the funding? it is not at all related to compliance. how to address your question, compliance is something that we are talking about every day. we are aggressively doing professional development with staff and teams to improve compliance. we are truly addressing it at every opportunity. i am not sure if the commissioners have received on this, they are working with us. we have a representative who spends quite a bit of time with us. they're coming back until we get 100% correct. i don't h
and fortunate that he is a great young man, and god uses a son that doesn't speak to teach me so many things all day every day. i rarely talk about that because if it hits to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change eve
, thank you for working very closely with us. for carmen, who was assigned by board president to lead the effort again this year on the budget. and for the other members of the board of supervisors that have engaged directly with us. supervisors avalos, kim, elsbernd, cohen. and the department heads that worked very hard with us. i see of they cisneros, who the police chief and our fire chief. barbara garcia and trent have worked extremely closely with us because of the tremendous pressure that we feel at the state level and the national of bochum, trying to get a really good conversation about how we can make sure that the community based organizations that provide invaluable service to us are taken care of and working in collaboration with us. hall of the a jar work that she does with all of us. i want to thank her for her tremendous leadership. again, i can say about about my good friend, someone who i got the chance to work with for many years. you have taken up so many complicated challenges this year, we're going to keep you busy. thank you for your wonderful team. our new city
now!" on the road in baltimore, maryland, the u.s. to repeat as the arms trade treaty, the first-ever global agreement regulating the $60 billion arms trade. we will speak with william hartung, author of, "prophets of war: lockheed martin and the making of the military- industrial complex." then, the conversion of a climate change skeptic. we will speak with a scientist once funded by the right wing koch brothers. >> one, recognize how bad it is. the surprising answer is, so far it has not been very bad. >> years of denying global warming, university of california professor richard muller now says global warming is real and that humans are almost entirely responsible. bill mckibben on "global warming's terrifying new math." >> the key steps are to keep the oil and coal in the ground, not to open the arctic to drilling, not to put up that pipeline to the tar sands. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama has reportedly issued secret authorization for the u.s. to support rebels seeking
-- joining us in the car sharing program for their members who want to use bmw products. this idea of cars sharing has been a part of san francisco's objective in creating a more sharing economy. like many other cities, we are congested in our parking. parking is really a challenge in the city. for people who own vehicles, and introducing people to car- sharing programs and ideas have been a wonderful experiment for us. as you know, we have been working to create not only public garages but also in congested neighborhoods. when a private company like bmw registers their interest in car- sharing, that is a complement to the direction we are heading to be morris -- more sustainable. i want to think bmw for being here. we are in negotiations to get us into our fleet so we can utilize. unless we do it with the latest technology, people will not appreciate the mayor driving a bmw. [laughter] but we are doing it for the right reasons. i want to showcase that as we lead this country into a thought process, a challenge that our major cities, our urban settings can have solutions to our parking pro
, who is a favorite of washington economic conservatives. last night, ryan almost used the exact same language as romney to describe the stakes of this election. >> it's not a very good political climate right now, but that's because we have an enormously high stakes election. >> reporter: other members of the romney short list include ohio senator rob portman and former men michb minnesota governor tim pawlenty, want the suspense ended. are you ready for this decision to be made? are you tired of the questions? >> i'm ready for it to be made, i am. >> reporter: this week of the campaign has been marked by an ugly tone. >> and she passed away in 22 days. i do not think mitt romney realizes what he's done to anyone. >> what does it say about a president's character, when his campaign tries to use the tragedy of a woman's death for political gain? >> reporter: with three new polls out today showing the president leading by seven points or more, even romney seems to acknowledge the negative turn is hurting him. >> our campaign would be helped immensely, if we had an agreement between bot
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 12,179 (some duplicates have been removed)